28 Days Of Inspiration – Day 13

The 2016 World Series

Of the major sports in the United States, baseball is arguably the most storied.  The championship series is clearly the oldest of the major championships. I’ve discussed in this blog before that for sports fans, even perhaps non-sports fans as well, history matters.  The 1903 World Series was the start of America’s love affair with the game, and we’ve been watching the storyline in a few different incarnations more or less since…you know, except for 1904…and 1994.

We watched in 2004 as the Boston Red Sox improbably beat the New York Yankees in 7-games to advance to the World Series after going down in the series 3-0 to win their first World Championship since 1918.  The next year, the Chicago White Sox won their first World Series since 1917…of course, they had the opportunity to win the 1919 World Series, but there was this little gambling scandal and all.

This of course left two franchises with a World Series drought: The Cleveland Indians and the team from the Northside of Chicago, the Cubs.

Now, the Indians had the opportunity in 1997, taking a little upstart team from Florida into extra innings in Game 7, but in the end lost their bid on an RBI single. AS an aside, I remember listening to that game driving home from the 1997 MLS Cup Championship game in Washington DC.  If the Red Sox couldn’t break their curse, the Indians shouldn’t be able to, and lo, they weren’t.

The Cubs have had an even more tortured history with the baseball championship.  The lore includes the curse of the billy goat, curing the teams’ chances in the 1945 World Series…where they haven’t been since.

So here we are – 2016.  68 years since the Cleveland Indians won the World Series; 108 years since the Cubs were World Champions.  By the end of this series, one of these historic franchises will have broken a curse, will accomplish something that most people alive today have never seen and may perhaps launch a new dynasty.  In 2003, if you had told me after the Red Sox got bounced from the ALCS, that they will win three times in the next ten years, I wouldn’t have believed it.

The amazing story and the guaranteed heartache the fans of one of these teams will feel, the guaranteed elation, the feeling that nothing will remotely come close just cannot be over-estimated.  I know – I’ve lived that feeling as a Red Sox fan.  Cleveland and Chicago are both 4 wins away from erasing generations of disappointment and despair.

THIS is what inspiration looks like to me as a sports fan.  Generations coming together.  The common connections within these cities.  The comradery felt – even if it’s for ten days or so – has no equal, and is understood by only a few.  It’s a disappointing season for Yankees fans if they don’t win it all.  For fans of one of these two teams, it will be adulation.  For fans of both of these teams, it will be a season to remember.

And that to me is inspiring.

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28 Days of Inspiration – Day 12

Foster Parents

There are some 653,000 children in the foster care system or waiting for adoption in the United States. These are the most vulnerable people in our society.

Foster care is a system in which a minor child has been placed into a ward, certified, or private home of a caregiver, referred to as a “foster parent”. The placement of the child is normally arranged through the government or a social service agency. The institution, group home or foster parent is compensated for expenses.

These people willingly accept someone elses’ kids into their homes, see to it that they get to school, that they’re safe from making harmful choices they may otherwise be making.  It’s a challenge – the kids often don’t want to be there, or if they are they test the rules of the house to be sure they’re really cared about.  They often don’t know how to make better choices.  Foster parents are truly people who are working to be the good they wish to see in the world.

No one is getting rich being a Foster parent.  In fact, they’re legally exposed: they’re responsible for the day to day care of this child, they have to ensure physical well being.  They’re opening their home up to the state to ensure they’re living up to their obligations.

They undergo background screens, go through over 70 hours of training, have their homes go through a home study process so they can care for someone else’s child.

They’re the people who are staying up all night when the foster child decides to take off overnight, they’re the ones taking the kid to the emergency room, they’re the ones who get the call from school.  All this for expense reimbursement.

Without foster parents, there are kids that won’t get a chance in life. Consider the statistics: 23,000 children simply aged out of the system in 2013. These kids have few social skills – 20% will wind up homeless after age 18 and 50% will be unemployed within six years.  Foster parents are sometimes the only chance these kids have.

It’s a remarkably selfless avocation with remarkably little reward.  Foster parents are literally society’s super heroes.

 

28 Days of Inspiration – Day 11

“Too Fat to Run” Julie Creffield

Julie is a marathon runner and has been for over ten years.  She’s also plus size – Size 18.  Her doctors told her she was too unfit to run after she pulled a muscle in her back. She was so inspired to prove the doctor wrong, three weeks later she ran the London Marathon and later founded a website “The Fat Girls’ Guide to Running” at toofattorun.co.uk.

The idea is to inspire people to get out and exercise.  Overweight people are particular risk for heart disease, diabetes, stroke among other health concerns. Julie’s site is part running club, part blog, part motivational speaker booking agency.  She’s all about getting plus size women out and active, running for their health.

Yesterdays entry was about speed.  She’s actively reaching out to women to try out different techniques for increasing their running speed.  Consider this: instead of advising other plus size women they’re too unfit to be running, she’s encouraging them to be out there and active.  Not only active: faster. If they want to be.

I always say to women that are just starting out that your running speed doesn’t matter, the most important thing is to get out there as often as you can and to learn to enjoy the sport regardless of any improvements of speed or distance.

Its incredibly important to find empowerment when perhaps you’re feeling vulnerable.  The last thing someone needs to hear is that they can’t do something.  Here’s someone asking people to get out there, be active, and enjoy themselves. To continue to work toward their goals.  Consider this tidbit from the CDC: “Physical activity reduces risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes beyond that produced by weight reduction alone.”

It’s more important to be active to reduce the risks of heart disease.  Julie is out there encouraging women to get out there and be active.

 

 

28 Days of Inspiration – Day 10

Day 10 – Acting With Intention

Diving into a new routine is always difficult.  Consider this, the conventional wisdom is that it takes 21-days to create a new habit.  To this I would suggest that it takes exponentially longer if that habit is really not something you WANT to do, and considerably shorter if it is.  Consider this: committing to a new exercise program is significantly different than committing to eating a Twinkee every day.  The pay off of that sugar rush, that creamy goodness, really doesn’t take long for the brain to say, YAS!

We spend so much of our lives running on autopilot.  Don’t believe me? At some random point during your commute pay attention to where you have your hands on your car’s steering wheel or the wear pattern on your brake pedal or how you’re holding your phone as you listen to music.  You haven’t even thought about it, but there it is.  Your foot is in the same spot where the wear pattern shows it will be.  “Just a minute” becomes 15 or 20 because you find yourself engrossed in Candy Crush or some other mindless time killer phone app.  What can possibly be more demotivating than heading to bed at the end of the day and realizing that you have accomplished nothing of value?  That’s why we look forward to New Years so much – a new year, a new opportunity to make a difference; yet by December 30th we’ve not done what we’ve set out to do because we’ve failed to act with intention.

What can you do to help yourself do this? Remove sources of temptation.  If Twinkees are the nemesis to your goal, avoid having them in the house; if it’s alcohol, avoid situations where you’ll have temptations.

Define your “WHY.” Why is this thing worth accomplishing.  For me, I have a fitness goal to achieve.  Why? Because my kids look to me as a role model.  I can either be a positive, a negative, or neutral role model in their lives.  I want, more than anything, to be a positive role model.  I see myself as someone who does not quit, therefore I will not quit this fitness program.

It helps to set micro goals or benchmarks along the way.  We make the mistake every January of saying “I’m going to lose 20 pounds this year,” and then come December 1 when we haven’t lost any weight, we have the guilt of another lost year and another failed goal.  How about “I’m going to lose a pound a week for 20 weeks” or even better “I’m going to eat 500 less calories a week.”

Our modern lives are so complex, and we’re urged to take the simplest course to a decision.  Stop and consider those choices.  Act with intention, consider why you’re making these choices.  Take control of your life just through the simple act of considering what you’re doing.

28 Days Of Inspiration – Day 9

“I’m Sorry.” 

Some days it’s harder than others to find inspiration.  I’ve deliberately stayed away from typical names or sayings in favor of more frequently overlooked subject matter; inspiration comes from many sources, but trite sources are hardly if ever inspirational.  I also seek to be educational as well: there’s no use in pointing people to things they may already know.  Taking this approach, though, means that I’ve really got to put some thought into the day’s inspiration; each of these days has been pointed by thoughtful consideration.

Today has not been a terribly inspiring day for me, indeed downright uninspiring.  It’s really difficult to “man up” sometimes, admit mistakes, admit misdeeds and try to make them right.  Doing so confronts the all to familiar reality that we’re not perfect, we are capable of hurting people we love through thoughtless action.

But there is a silver lining, and an inspirational one at that.  Realizing our weaknesses allows us the opportunity to confront them, allows us the opportunity to take control over them; to harness that power we all have and focus it on becoming a better person.

That’s the internal, but it also allows for forgiveness.  It opens the door for your loved one to forgive.  Hate and anger are such destructive forces; they eat you up, steal your time and attention with negativity.  But they’re natural, and expected, responses to having been hurt.  Sometimes those who have been hurt aren’t ready to immediately forgive, but the door has been opened for them to do so.  You can’t always undo what you’ve behaved your way into, but recognizing the damage you’ve done and taking responsibility for it brings that healing much faster. Want evidence? Hospitals and Doctors who apologize for medical errors get sued less.  Apologies are medicine.

So today’s inspiration is the apology.  That heartfelt message that you know and understand the consequences of your actions, your regret, your accepting responsibility can be incredibly inspirational for those around you, and empowering for you to make important changes.

28 Days of Inspiration – Day 8

Giving Dap
It’s a concept most of us are at least passingly familiar with, that routinized and apparently choreographed handshake between two friends, perhaps teammates, expressing welcome or congratulations.

According to Wikipedia, the practice has it’s origins in the 1960’s early 1970’s among African American soldiers in Vietnam as a means of expressing solidarity with the Black Power movement.

Now, why I find this inspirational.  It’s fun to meet a friend and to engage in a well worn tradition between the two of you, that perhaps only you two can anticipate.  But more than that, it’s a visible expression to all who see it that these are two people who share something in common – maybe it’s respect, or friendship, or a common goal – but whatever it is, it’s shared between them.  You cannot be that in sync with someone with whom you share nothing in common.

It’s an expression of solidarity: anyone who witnesses people giving dap know those two people care about each other at some level.  It signifies bonds that perhaps aren’t spoken, just felt.  Regardless of what they may say, anyone I’ve ever known who have accomplished anything needs to have someone they care about give them some positive regard and this is but one means by which that’s conveyed.

As I see it, there are two ways to see the world: as a great place with some bad actors or a bad place with some good actors. I choose to see the world as a place with a majority of good folks with reasonable intentions. Sometimes I need to be reminded of that, particularly when the politics of my great country are bogged down in appeals to the lowest common denominator. Hence, my 28 days of inspiration. Sometimes all it takes for my world view to be reawakened is seeing two people give each other that regard, showing each other that affection.

Give someone that phat dap instead of throwing shade today.

 

 

28 Days Of Inspiration – Day 7

O’Connell Valor Fund

12032154_976861252357160_4209385470131246592_nSo far, the 28 Days have largely focused on individuals: George Washington Carver, James Stockdale for instance.  The first day was dedicated to the observance of a specific day influenced by a person, Ada Lovelace Day, but otherwise the inspiration has been person centric.  Today we move away from that a bit.

The O’Connell Valor Fund is a registered charity with its sole purpose to raise money to help Veterans who may be having a hard time of it and providing them with some of the small necessities of life.  The mission statement is simple:

Our goal is simple – help our U.S. Military heroes, next-of-kin, and families better cope with daily life so they can heal with some peace of mind knowing basic essentials are covered. This might include a monthly utility bill payment, groceries for the week, making sure their child’s birthday is a little extra special, and many other basic essentials many of us take for granted.

Fully 100% of donations are purposed directly to the charity’s programs – 100% – because it’s run as a labor of love by its founder, Richard O’Connell after he set it up in honor of two Uncles who served in the US Military.

It’s a modest mission, but an earnest one.  Food gift cards for a Veteran’s family; a heating oil purchase.  Just the little things that can go unattended because of the demands of the larger things.  I am regularly canvased by huge non-profit organizations  whose donations are often eaten away at by overhead costs  and not one of them can promote 100% of donations going directly to the people the organization serves.

Richard puts the money where his mouth is: he ran a 50k race to raise money for a vet in need, he donates his time to the charity, and he runs it without any salary or expense reimbursement.

It’s inspirational for me to see how one person can take a vision and make such an impact for those who have given their time, health, commitment for this country.  One man, one entity designed to make life better for those who offer to defend this country.

Take a minute. “Like” the Facebook page.  Maybe send a small donation.  Or even better, find out what you can do to raise up people in need.